Tag Archives: suburbs

The new reality: My new book

My new book is out The new reality for suburban schools: How suburban schools are struggling with low income students and students of color (Peter Lang, 2015).  It showcases three case studies of suburban middle schools whose demographics have changed over the last 15 years. These are schools that have largely white staffs that are unfamiliar with and have negative views of students of color, especially poor students. Given the larger context, of racism that built these suburban communities (i.e. The GI Bill, segregated housing policies, and white flight), there are larger challenges to improving this situation. However, I suggest ways that the schools can do better if they examine their own biases and start to listen to their students.

 

Book photo

 

What is happening in the suburbs? Are they the new cities?

suburban poverty When we think about the suburbs, we think affluence- big houses and lawns, not poverty. But the suburbs are becoming increasingly poor. The Brookings Institute published a report recently that explained how poverty grew by 66% in suburban communities across the country since 2000. They are also increasingly populated by people of color, and before too long whites will be in the minority altogether.

The suburbs did not start out that way, and were founded more as an escape for whites fleeing “urban” people and problems. Starting in the 1980’s, that started to change as people of color started to move to the suburbs in larger numbers and immigrants by-passed cities in favor of suburban communities.

The suburbs did not change to meet this influx of new residents though, leading to serious inequity: unequal access to employment, stable housing, and healthcare. One obvious example is transportation. The suburbs privilege transport by car, low income families who rely on public bus transportation have many more obstacles to accessing services, attending job fairs, going to work or going to school board meetings.

Problems like these do not just require a simple policy shift. They require those with power to share it in order to address the problems that are being created. That will involve spending dollars in a new way. Now that the suburbs are facing problems similar to those of cities, perhaps they can get ahead of the curve. Suburban districts need to build low income housing, health clinics, and new public transportation. Resources may need to be shifted to fund more translation services, social services, and to support bi-lingual programs in schools. These changes won’t come easy but are necessary if there is hope of equity in the ‘burbs.

My new book, The New Reality, coming out in Fall of 2015 will detail how these dynamics are playing out in suburban schools. It contains case studies of middle schools trying to sort out how to meet the needs of the students that they face when the infrastructure of the suburbs does not provide for the students and their families.